Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now by Dana L. Davis

Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now by Dana L. Davis

I would like to be able to say that I read this in seven days, just like the book takes place in seven days, but that would be a lie. I read this in two days. It was impossible to put down and it might have slowed down my packing up my dorm room, but it was worth it. This book made me laugh so much and I really needed to laugh, because packing up and moving is very stressful. Tiffany is a great character, she knows who she is uses that to shape her future. The first scene we get of Tiffany is on an airplane as it lands. Tiffany is deathly afraid of flying and this scene is an a great introduction to Tiffany as a character. It shows her constant fear and anxiety, but it also shows how she handles herself in tough situations. My favorite part of her is the way she is so honest with herself and never feels self conscious about where she is from. Another amazing aspect of this book? FRIENDSHIP! I love that this book has no romance, not everything has to be about romance, people can just be good friends in high school! Tiffany and Marcus show just this, they have an easy going friendship that allows them to be themselves while helping each other grow. Another amazing thing about this book (there are just so many), it has a really neat discussion of religion. So often religion and teenagers are not put together in a book, but Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now does a great job of discussing religion, how to allow people to be religious without overstepping while also exploring questions about religion and having good discussions about it. Tiffany’s new dad, Anthony and his family are  Jehovah Witness’, this creates issues for Tiffany as she struggles with her own faith after the death of her mother. She is able to have deep discussions about religion with Marcus and even with Anthony, although those discussions are not as deep. With Anthony, she talks about accepting her understanding of religion where it is and she even calls him out for homophobia against Marcus’ mothers. I saw a recommendation for this book on twitter, and I am so glad that I took them up on their recommendation. It has been a great two days of reading about Tiffany Sly and her new life in California. Wait, one last thing I want to mention about how amazing this book is (did I mention how many parts of it were amazing?), is the way that Tiffany is about to see that moving to California and going to a new school doesn’t mean that she has to give up her old life and her old friendships, but that she can add them on to her life experiences, it is not replacing but just continuing. This was done in a very subtle way but it really stood out to me as I was reading.

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